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20_Outcast

   When he gained the crest of the Magazine Hill he halted and looked along the river towards Dublin, the lights of which burned redly and hospitably in the cold night. He looked down the slope and, at the base, in the shadow of the wall of the Park, he saw some human figures lying. Those venal and furtive loves filled him with despair. He gnawed the rectitude of his life; he felt that he had been outcast from life’s feast. One human being had seemed to love him and he had denied her life and happiness: he had sentenced her to ignominy, a death of shame. He knew that the prostrate creatures down by the wall were watching him and wished him gone. No-one wanted him; he was outcast from life’s feast. He turned his eyes to the grey gleaming river, winding along towards Dublin. Beyond the river he saw a goods train winding out of Kingsbridge Station, like a worm with a fiery head winding through the darkness, obstinately and laboriously. It passed slowly out of sight but still he heard in his ears the laborious drone of the engine reiterating the syllables of her name.

James Joyce. A Painful Case, Dubliners (Page 98)

Joyce links the train stations of Sydney Parade where Mrs. Sinico is the subject of a tragic accident and Kingsbridge, now Hueston Station, which Mr. Duffy overlooks from the Magazine Fort in the Phoenix Park as he makes his way home to Chapelizod. Joyce uses the syllables in her name to evoke the sound of the departing goods train. Joyce took the name Sinico from Giuseppe Sinico, his singing teacher in Trieste.

I ran down and around the Magazine Fort, looking down to Hueston Station. It is now difficult to see the trains as the foreground view is obscured by buildings, but by reputation there are still furtive loves taking place in the Park as darkness falls.

Mrs. Sinico appears in Ulysses on a number of occasions relating to her internment in Glasnevin Cemetery, which Bloom attended.

    He compressed between 2 fingers the flesh circumjacent to a cicatrice in the left infracostal region below the diaphragm resulting from a sting infected 2 weeks and 3 days previously (23x May 1904) by a bee. He scratched imprecisely with his right hand, though insensible of prurition, various points and surfaces of his partly exposed, wholly abluted skin. He inserted his left hand into the left lower pocket of his waistcoat and extracted and replaced a silver coin (I shilling), placed there (presumably) on the occasion (17 October 1903) of the interment of Mrs Emily Sinico, Sydney Parade.

James Joyce. Ulysses (Page 584)

Bibliography

Joyce, J. (1998) Ulysses. Edited by Hans Walter Gabler, Wolfhard Steppe, and Claus Melchior. Afterward by Michael Gordon edn. New York, United States: Vintage Books.

Joyce, J. (2006) Dubliners, Authoritative Text, Contexts, Criticism. Edited by Margot Norris, Hans Walter Gabler, and Walter Hettche. New York, United States: Norton, W. W. & Company.

Click here to see the route details on Runkeeper

19_EveryBond

    Mr. Duffy was very much surprised. Her interpretation of his words disillusioned him. He did not visit her for a week; then he wrote to her asking her to meet him. As he did not wish their last interview to be troubled by the influence of their ruined confessional they met in a little cakeshop near the Parkgate. It was cold autumn weather but in spite of the cold they wandered up and down the roads of the Park for nearly three hours. They agreed to break off their intercourse: every bond, he said, is a bond to sorrow. When they came out of the Park they walked in silence towards the tram; but here she began to tremble so violently that, fearing another collapse on her part, he bade her goodbye quickly and left her. A few days later he received a parcel containing his books and music.

James Joyce. A Painful Case, Dubliners (Pages 93, 94)

The Phoenix Park plays a central role in Finnegans Wake but many stories in Dubliners skirt around the Park, much as the city does. A Painful Case mainly centres around events at Sydney Parade, but in the quote above Mr. James Duffy and Mrs. Sinico endure a break up in their nearly three hour walk through the park. The Magazine Fort is mentioned in both this story and Finnegans Wake and it’s where I will run off to next.

Bibliography

Joyce, J. (2006) Dubliners, Authoritative Text, Contexts, Criticism. Edited by Margot Norris, Hans Walter Gabler, and Walter Hettche. New York, United States: Norton, W. W. & Company.

Click here to see the route details on Runkeeper

18_TheOnceFamous

    Mr Bloom and Stephen entered the cabman’s shelter, an unpretentious wooden structure, where, prior to then, he had rarely if ever been before, the former having previously whispered to the latter a few hints anent the keeper of it said to be the once famous Skin-the-Goat Fitzharris, the invincible, though he could not vouch for the actual facts which quite possibly there was not one vestige of truth in. A few moments later saw our two noctambules safely seated in a discreet corner only to be greeted by stares from the decidedly miscellaneous collection of waifs and strays and other nondescript specimens of the genus homo already there engaged in eating and drinking diversified by conversation for whom they seemingly formed an object of marked curiosity.

James Joyce. Ulysses (Page 508)

In 1882 the year Joyce was born, on 6th May, Lord Frederick Cavendish the Chief Secretary for Ireland and Thomas Henry Burke, Head of the Irish Civil Service, were murdered in the Phoenix Park. The murders were undertaken by “the Irish Invincibles” and are written about in the book The Phoenix Park Murders; Conspiracy, Betrayal & Retribution, (2006), Mercier Press, Cork written by Senan Molony.

An interesting point to note is that Joyce marks the year of the murders as 1881 when in fact they took place in 1882. Of course Joyce could be playing on the date being mistaken by Myles Crawford or indeed deliberately putting it in the year before he himself was actually born.

THE GREAT GALLAHER
—You can do it, Myles Crawford repeated, clenching his hand in emphasis. Wait a minute. We’ll paralyse Europe as Ignatius Gallaher used to say when he was on the shaughraun, doing billiardmarking in the Clarence. Gallaher, that was a pressman for you. That was a pen. You know how he made his mark? I’ll tell you. That was the smartest piece of journalism ever known. That was in eightyone, sixth of May, time of the invincibles, murder in the Phoenix park, before you were born, I suppose. I’ll show you.

James Joyce. Ulysses (Pages 111,112)

James “Skin-the-Goat” Fitzharris was one of the car drivers and received a sentence of Penal Servitude for life. He was released in 1899 and died in September 1910. He appears in the Eumaeus episode of Ulysses when Stephen and Bloom take a break from their nocturnal wanderings.

When I ran along Chesterfield Avenue, the main spine of the Park, I could find no plaque or identifying mark. This obviously reflects the difficult relationship between Great Britain and the Republic of Ireland, but for such a major event it is surprising. The scene of the crime was directly across from the Viceregal Lodge, now Aras an Uachtarain.

Bibliography

Joyce, J. (1998) Ulysses. Edited by Hans Walter Gabler, Wolfhard Steppe, and Claus Melchior. Afterward by Michael Gordon edn. New York, United States: Vintage Books.

Molony, S. (2006) The Phoenix Park Murders: Conspiracy, Betrayal & Retribution. Cork, Ireland: The Mercier Press.

Click here to see the route details on Runkeeper

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